My Cart

Close

Only Child in the Wild: Border Co

Posted on
.
Only Child in the Wild is all about taking a dive into the lives of creative women, learning more about their process and what makes them tick.  Today we're taking a seat with Justine Bolzon, the amazingly talented woodworker behind Border Co..  Every piece that Justine makes blends beauty with function, one quick scroll through her instagram has us wanting to replace every tired looking object in our kitchen with one of her pieces.
.
Read on to learn more about her creative practice and see how she styles her Arden Top:
.
.
How did you get started?
I’ve always been one for hobbies, as a kid my sister and I would choreograph dance routines to songs we liked and make costumes out of coloured cardboard and scraps of fabric to wear while we forced our dad to film us! Then my interests broadened to jewellery making and knitting. Woodworking, though, was something I didn’t discover until I was at Uni. While completing my teaching degree I did work experience in a workshop and became totally addicted to working with timbers. A few years after that, once I’d started working as a teacher, I discovered some really gnarly, old carving tools in the workshop at school and took them home over the holidays to give carving a go. It just grew from there, I bought new tools, experimented with different timbers and discovered a deep passion like I’d never really known before.
 
What are some of your biggest sources of inspiration?
I’ve always been really inspired by Ariele Alasko and the way she’s constantly challenging herself to move her work in new directions. I identify a lot with the need to keep things fresh and interesting and seeing how she works through inspiration rough patches always gives me the courage to try new things too. I also find a lot inspiration for my work by looking at the work of contemporary jeweller’s, they always have a great sense of scale of geometry that informs a lot of my work.
.
.
What does a typical day of work look like?  What is your favorite way to spend a day off?
My week’s a pretty disjointed at the moment as I’m working as a teacher part time, running Border co and also studying photography one day a week. When I do get the chance to have a whole day dedicated to woodworking I usually get straight out of bed and am in the workshop by 7.30am. I’m the kind of person who needs to feel like I’ve accomplished something in a day, and that thing needs to be tangible - so if I can get things done first thing it helps to settle my mind and my nerves. I work through to lunch then have a bit of break and after that I take things a bit more slowly. My work day always ends at around 4 when Luna (my 4 year old Border Collie) demands a walk.
 
Day’s off are pretty rare for me - I’m addicted to making! But when I do force myself to step away from the workshop my partner, Dave (an amazing illustrator who’s equally addicted to work as I am) and I go for drives into the country around Adelaide. He takes an easel and paints and I wander around and take photographs. An indulgent lunch with a beer is usually on the agenda too.
.
.
What are some of your requirements when it comes to clothing?  Do you have a separate wardrobe for work and life or are they one and the same?
I’m a minimalist when it comes to clothing. That wasn’t always the case, in my younger years you could usually spot me a mile away as I’d be the girl wearing 3 different clashing patterns with a pair of shiny silver brogues… These days I like my clothing to be ethically made out of natural fibres with a simple shape. I love items that have simple, unobtrusive details. I’ve always loved Mies Van Der Rohe’s motto ‘God is in the details’ - that what I have in mind when adding items to my wardrobe. I wish I could say that I separate items in my wardrobe for work and life, but I tend to just wear everything all the time. I’ve lost many a loved item to glue spills over the years...
 
Who are some of your favorite artists or style icons?
I absolutely love Lee Vosburgh (Style Bee). Her simple approach to style is absolutely what I strive for.
.
What's the biggest lesson you've learned in owning your own business?
The biggest thing I’ve learned owning a business is how important relationships are. Building relationships with customers, fans, fellow makers, have been really important in keeping myself focused and giving my work direction. There are a few friends, both local and through Instagram, who I turn to often for advice or who act as a touchstone in those times when I feel like it’s all a bit much.
.
. 
What's up next for you?
I’ve realised that I’m really bad at big picture planning, I’m usually just flying by the seat of my trousers most of the time! So next on my agenda is to sit down and plan what’s next!
.
Justine Wears the Arden Top in Grey, Shop the Arden Here

0 comments

Leave a comment

Hello You!

Join our mailing list